How did Christianity spread to the Anglo Saxon culture?

Through the baptism of monarchs and the establishment of royal hegemonies, the Christian faith spread throughout the elite of Anglo-Saxon England. Arguably, it was the work of missionaries that eventually ended Germanic paganism amongst the general populations of these Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

Why did Anglo-Saxons convert to Christianity?

When the Anglo-Saxons arrived in Britain, they were Pagans worshipping a number of different gods. Pope Gregory the Great of Rome wanted to convert the Saxons to Christianity.

How did Christianity affect the pagan culture of the Anglo-Saxons?

Christianity then spread to other parts of Britain. The pope gave orders that pagan temples should be converted into Christian ones and that pagan celebrations should also be made into Christian ones. Churches, usually built of wood, were built in Saxon villages all over Britain.

Did Jesus ever go to England?

Some Arthurian legends hold that Jesus travelled to Britain as a boy, lived at Priddy in the Mendips, and built the first wattle cabin at Glastonbury. William Blake’s early 19th-century poem “And did those feet in ancient time” was inspired by the story of Jesus travelling to Britain.

What were the beliefs of the Anglo-Saxons?

The Saxons were very superstitious and believed in elves, goblins and dragons. The Anglo-Saxons worshipped the gods Tiw, Woden, Thor and Frig. From these words come the names of our days of the week: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday.

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Were the Anglo-Saxons Vikings?

Vikings were pagans and often raided monasteries looking for gold. Money paid as compensation. The Anglo-Saxons came from The Netherlands (Holland), Denmark and Northern Germany. The Normans were originally Vikings from Scandinavia.

What did the English believe in before Christianity?

Before the Romans introduced Christianity into Britain, the dominant belief system was Celtic polytheism/paganism. This was the religion with the priestly class called the druids (who we have all heard so much about, but who we actually know very little about).