What does Scout learn when she goes to church with Calpurnia?

By going to church with Calpurnia, Scout learns about who she is outside of work at the Finch’s house. “That Calpurnia led a modest double life never dawned on me. The idea that she had a separate existence outside our household was a novel one, to say nothing of her having command of two languages” (167).

What happens when Scout and Jem go to church with Calpurnia?

Calpurnia prevails, and when she walks into church with Scout and Jem, people rise to greet them with respect. One woman, however, stops Calpurnia, protesting, ‘You ain’t got no business bringin’ white chillun here–they got their church, we got our’n. … Jem protests, explaining they have their own money.

What are three things that Scout learns at Calpurnia’s church?

First, she learns that not all black people in Maycomb are welcoming or appreciative of whites, though, on the whole, the church members treat her with warmth and kindness. Second, she learns that there are no hymnals, a situation she finds odd until she realizes that much of the community can’t read.

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What does Scout learn when she accompanies Calpurnia to church?

What does Scout learn when she accompanies Calpurnia to church? … Scout learns that Calpurnia has to change the way she talks to make her seem the same as them. She didn’t want them to think that she thinks she better with them. Scout also learns that the colored church is very poor and didn’t have any hymn-books.

What do the children learn about Calpurnia when they go to her church?

In Chapter 12, Calpurnia takes Jem and Scout to Sunday service at First Purchase African American M.E. Church. As a result of their visit, Scout learns some information about Calpurnia that she never knew. Scout learns that Calpurnia is older than her father and that she celebrates her birthday on Christmas.

What are some signs that Scout is growing up?

In To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout shows signs of maturing and growing up by appealing to Mr. Cunningham’s interests at the jail, recognizing the hypocrisy of Miss Gates, showing concern for Jem and Atticus, accepting that Jem is growing up, and showing respect to and empathizing with Boo Radley.

Why are Jem and Scout so welcome in this church?

Why are Jem and Scout so welcome in this church? They are welcome because they are friends of Calpurnia’s and they are the children of the man defending Tom Robinson. … No one wants to hire her and she has to take care of her children.

Why doesn’t Atticus take Jem and Scout to church?

Why doesn’t Atticus take Jem & Scout to church in Chapter 12? He thinks they are too old for it. He is away at a meeting with the State Legislature. … He is back in Maycomb and he kisses Scout.

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Why does Calpurnia speak differently in church than she does at home?

Calpurnia speaks differently in her church to because it would “aggravate” the people there if she spoke the way she does among white people – members would think she was “putting on airs”, trying to act better than them (Chapter 12).

How does Calpurnia affect Scout?

Calpurnia is a positive influence on Scout throughout the novel. She is a caring individual who is quick to discipline the children when they get out of hand. Calpurnia teaches Scout several lessons in manners and increases her perspective on life.

Why does Calpurnia wear a mask?

Scout states that Calpurnia is a different person at church compared to who she is at home. Her mask comes from the prejudice of the town. She can finally relax and be herself at church. She hides behind her job.

What does Scout ask Calpurnia at the end of Chapter 12?

Cal reluctantly tells her that Bob Ewell has accused him of raping Ewell’s daughter. First, Scout wonders why anyone would listen to the Ewells, and then asks Calpurnia what rape is.

What does Scout say about lying?

I said I would like it very much, which was a lie, but one must lie under certain circumstances and at all times when one can’t do anything about them.” This is Scout’s answer when Atticus asks her if she would like her aunt to come live with them.