What is the entry of a church called?

The narthex is an architectural element typical of early Christian and Byzantine basilicas and churches consisting of the entrance or lobby area, located at the west end of the nave, opposite the church’s main altar. … By extension, the narthex can also denote a covered porch or entrance to a building.

What is the difference between a narthex and vestibule?

As nouns the difference between vestibule and narthex

is that vestibule is (architecture) a passage, hall or room, such as a lobby, between the outer door and the interior of a building while narthex is (architecture) a western vestibule leading to the nave in some (especially orthodox) christian churches.

What defines a church?

1 : a building for public and especially Christian worship. 2 : the clergy or officialdom of a religious body the word church … is put for the persons that are ordained for the ministry of the Gospel, that is to say, the clergy— J. Ayliffe. 3 often capitalized : a body or organization of religious believers: such as.

Where is the vestibule located in a church?

vestibule Add to list Share. A vestibule is a little area just inside the main door of a building, but before a second door. You often find vestibules in churches, because they help keep heat from escaping every time someone enters or exits.

What is another name for narthex?

What is another word for narthex?

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porch entrance
entry vestibule
foyer lobby
portal portico
anteroom galilee

What is a portico on a church?

Noun. 1. portico – a porch or entrance to a building consisting of a covered and often columned area. narthex – portico at the west end of an early Christian basilica or church. porch – a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance.

What is meaning of LYCH gate?

Lych-gate, also spelled lich-gate, also called corpse gate, (from Middle English lyche, “body”; yate, “gate”) roofed-in gateway to a churchyard in which a bier might stand while the introductory part of the burial service was read.